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Ireland Baldwin Pushes Back On Lily-Rose Depp’s ‘Nepotism Baby’ Comments

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Ireland Baldwin is taking time to acknowledge her privilege in the wake of Lily-Rose Depp’s headline-making stance on nepotism in Hollywood.

Depp, the daughter of Johnny Depp and Vanessa Paradis, stirred controversy earlier this month after shrugging off the implication that she received preferential treatment from film casting and modeling agencies because of her famous parents.

“I know my childhood didn’t look like everybody’s childhood, and it’s a very particular thing to deal with, but it’s also the only thing that I know,” she told Elle magazine. “It’s weird to me to reduce somebody to the idea that they’re only there because it’s a generational thing. It just doesn’t make any sense.”

Not surprisingly, Depp’s thoughts on so-called “nepotism” or “nepo babies” ― a term condescendingly applied to children born into celebrity families ― drew a blistering response from others in the modeling and acting industries as well as online.

Baldwin, the daughter of actors Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger, offered a more tempered view in a series of short videos posted to her TikTok account last week. After acknowledging that Depp is “very capable of being a model” and has “proven herself in a lot of ways,” she added, “I would never have become a model if it weren’t for who my parents were.”

“I wouldn’t be where I am, I wouldn’t have gotten where I am and been able to do what I can do if it weren’t for my parents,” Baldwin added in a follow-up video. “I think really where you go wrong is denying that.”

Still, she urged viewers to ease up on the criticisms of Depp, noting that the comments were likely “coming out of a defensive place.”

“You get a place where you get really tired of answering questions about your parents because you so desperately want to be someone separate from all of that, especially when you choose a career that is in the public eye,” she explained.

Though it’s difficult to argue that having famous parents doesn’t come with major professional (and financial) benefits when making your way in show business, Depp isn’t the first celebrity offspring to publicly recoil at being branded a “nepo baby.”

In an interview with The Cut published last week, Lourdes Leon took a similarly defensive stance when asked whether being the eldest daughter of pop superstar Madonna was an advantage when recording her first EP.

“I want to feel like I deserve things and not just like I’ve been given things,” she said. “And, yes, there’s undeniable privilege that I’d be stupid to not realize. Nepotism babies are pretty awful usually, and my mom and my father raised me to be so much smarter than that.”

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Tina Turner survived an abusive relationship with Ike and death of two sons

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Tina Turner escaped an abusive relationship to find true love with her second husband, Erwin Bach.

The singer, who passed away aged 83 on Wednesday following an unspecified illness, was in a relationship with the record executive for 38 years. The pair married in 2013.

Tina had publicly praised Erwin for helping her find happiness after fleeing from her first marriage to husband, Ike Turner, which was plagued with physical and emotional abuse.

Ike first met Tina when she was a vulnerable teenager named Annie Mae Bullock. He renamed her Tina, and went on to form the musical duo, Ike & Tina Turner. According to Tina, he micromanaged her career, withheld her finances and beat her while she was pregnant.

After filing for divorce in 1978, Tina was left in debt and had her children to support. She went on to establish a successful solo career.

The songstress met Erwin in 1985 when he was working as an executive with EMI. The pair had an instant connection the moment they met, when he arrived to collect her from Düsseldorf airport.

She said Erwin had taught her how “to love without giving up who I am”, and that he had never been intimidated by her fame or success. He even donated a kidney to her in April 2017, which saved her life.

Writing in her book, Happiness Becomes You: A Guide to Changing Your Life for Good, Tina said: “Falling in love with my husband, Erwin, was another exercise in leaving my comfort zone, of being open to the unexpected gifts that life has to offer.

“The day I first met Erwin, at an airport in Germany, I should have been too tired from my flight, too preoccupied with thoughts of my concert tour. But I did notice him, and I instantly felt an emotional connection.

“Even then, I could have ignored what I felt — I could have listened to the ghost voices in my head telling me that I didn’t look good that day, or that I shouldn’t be thinking about romance because it never ends well. Instead, I listened to my heart.”

Tina’s spokesman confirmed she died “peacefully” at home and added: “With her, the world loses a music legend and a role model. With her music and her inexhaustible vitality, Tina Turner thrilled millions of fans and inspired many artists of subsequent generations.”

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Tina Turner: legendary rock’n’roll singer dies aged 83

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Tina Turner, the pioneering rock’n’roll star who became a pop behemoth in the 1980s, has died aged age of 83 after a long illness, her publicist has told the PA news agency.
Turner affirmed and amplified Black women’s formative stake in rock’n’roll, defining that era of music to the extent that Mick Jagger admitted to taking inspiration from her high-kicking, energetic live performances for his stage persona. After two decades of working with her abusive husband, Ike Turner, she struck out alone and – after a few false starts – became one of the defining pop icons of the 1980s with the album Private Dancer. Her life was chronicled in three memoirs, a biopic, a jukebox musical, and in 2021, the acclaimed documentary film, Tina.

“Turner’s musical character has always been a charged combination of mystery as well as light, melancholy mixed with a ferocious vitality that often flirted with danger,” scholar Daphne A Brooks wrote for the Guardian in 2018.
Turner was born Anna Mae Bullock on 26 November 1939 and raised in Nutbush, Tennessee, where she recalled picking cotton with her family as a child. She sang in the tiny town’s church choir, and as a teenager talked – or rather, sang – her way into Ike’s band in St Louis: he had declined her request to join until he heard her seize the microphone during a Kings of Rhythm performance for a rendition of BB King’s You Know I Love You.
She had suffered ill health in recent years, being diagnosed with intestinal cancer in 2016 and having a kidney transplant in 2017.

‘I was just tired of singing and making everybody happy’ … Tina Turner performs at the O2 Arena, London, in 2009. Photograph: Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

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Gerald Castillo, ‘Saved By the Bell’ and ‘General Hospital’ Actor, Dies at 90

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Veteran stage and screen actor Gerald Castillo, who appeared in major TV series including “Saved By the Bell,” “General Hospital,” “Hill Street Blues,” “M*A*S*H” and “Dallas,” died May 4 at his home in Houston. He was 90.

Known for his work as Major Slater on “Saved by the Bell” and Judge Davis Wagner on “General Hospital,” Castillo developed a following for his roles in the two series.

Born in Chicago on Dec. 23, 1932, Gerald studied acting and stage direction at the Goodman Theater. Following his education, he acted on stages all across the nation, performing opposite Sherman Hemsley, Rita Moreno, Jessica Tandy, James Broderick and Jeanne Crain. After performing with Hemsley, “The Jeffersons” star convinced Castillo to pursue a film and TV career in Los Angeles.

Castillo then appeared in several feature films, including “Delta Force II,” “Kinjite,” “Death Wish IV,” “State of Emergency,” “Through Naked Eyes,” and “Above Suspicion.”

Castillo also guest starred in several TV series, including “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” “Hill Street Blues,” “M*A*S*H,” “Dallas,” “Knots Landing,” “The Jeffersons,” “Night Court,” “Simon and Simon” and many more.

The screen and stage performer also worked as a stage director at numerous theaters in Los Angeles and Ventura County, including the Santa Paula Theater.

Castillo’s wife of 36 years, Danya Quinn-Castillo noted, “Many of the actors he worked with remember him as a charismatic and insightful director who would jingle the change in his pocket while he pondered a scene, then leap onto the stage to work out the blocking or whisper in an actor’s ear. He was revered for providing the support and guidance that allowed actors to fully develop their characters on stage.”

In 2012 he retired from acting and moved to Houston.

He was predeceased by his only child, daughter, Lisa Palmere.

Castillo is survived by his wife, grandson Brian Palmere, granddaughter Stephanie Palmere, great-grandson Allen Palmere and his twin brother, Bernie Castillo.

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